Halloween should not be changed

Shannon Harzula, Editor-In-Chief

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For centuries, Halloween has been celebrated across the globe. The holiday was introduced to America in the 1930’s by Gaelic immigrants and since then, Halloween has been celebrated every year on the 31st. Halloween is celebrated on that day because of the day that follows. This day is known as the Christians holy day of All Hallows’ Day. Halloween is celebrated the night before as a day of giving, thus why millions of children and families go trick – or – treating each year. This is also why many may hear Halloween be referred to as Hallows’ eve.

But as of recently, many have been proposing that the holiday date should be changed. Just like how Thanksgiving is the last Thursday of November, Halloween would be the last Saturday of October. Since Halloween is not a federal holiday, the president cannot officially move the date of Halloween.

Senior Emily Silva said, “Halloween is a holiday that has been celebrated for years to change it we would lose so much tradition.”

This has lead to a proposal of a new holiday, National Trick – or – Treat day. The holiday would take place on the last Saturday of every October starting this year. But this is completely unrealistic because there is nothing stopping anyone from celebrating Halloween whenever they please. This year Halloween falls on a Thursday and because of that many people will wait to throw costume parties and get togethers on weekends.

Even if the president were to decide to only have Halloween on a Saturday, there would not be enough incentive to have people stop celebrating on the 31st.

Many argue that by having Halloween on a Saturday it would be safer for children as most parents can accompany their children on a Saturday rather than a week day. In 2017 there were only 7,450 injuries according to the National Safety Council. With that being said, only 9% of those injuries were children related. Out of the 41 million trick – or – treaters that year this number is extremely small. But, if the right precautions are taken then there is absolutely no reason to change the date. By parents being with their children in a safe neighborhood at houses you know and trust\; and making sure to check the child’s candy, then the chances of something terrible happening will lower immensely.

Senior Madison Rose said, “It is all about precautions. If parents look after their children then there shouldn’t be any problems. Halloween is also celebrated on weekends too so there really is not a reason to change it.

In today’s world many children go trick – or – treating more than once, so if a parent cannot go with their child on the 31st there are already other days.

In a survey of 45 students, 26 students said yes to having gone trick – or – treating multiple times throughout the Halloween season as a child.

Senior Jessie Prusina said, “As a child there has never been a time where I didnt go trick – or – treating just once so changing the Halloween date is not needed as there are other options like trunk or treat if parents cannot take their children out on the 31st.”

Ultimately, by officially changing the date of Halloween we lose tradition that has been going on for centuries.

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