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PARCC Testing

CeCe Gunning '19, Staff Writer

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The national, standardized computer based test, the PARCC is happening during the next week at BHS. PARCC stands for The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and is an online test based off the Common Core Standard that implements from kindergarten to twelfth grade students.
This test comes with large amount of backlash from students have decided to opt out of testing. The alternative to taking the three hour test for five days is to either come to school and wait in the cafeteria, or to come in late and go to their classes in the afternoon. Attendance does apply to the classes after the PARCC as school days.
Nj.com displays after the PARCC 2016 test, the state announced that the majority of New Jersey students in grades 3-11 who took the PARCC exams failed to meet the grade level expectations set by the twelve states participating. New Jersey had the highest opt-out rate statewide, could this affect the passing rate?
Many students spoken to feel the PARCC testing is unnecessary and inefficient. Sophomore Annie Thomas says, “There is no point in taking hours of standardized testing if it is not a requirement and there is a choice to opt out. I think there is many others ways to prepare for college level testing besides for the this option”. This is true for the class of 2019, 2018, and graduating class of 2017 that no, the PARCC is not a graduation requirement, but, for freshman class and incoming classes passing this test at a proficient score is a new graduation requirement.
In the Somerset Hills District last year, 931 of the 2799 PARCC tests scheduled were not taken for reasons other than students being absent or a medical emergency. This means 33.26% of PARCC tests were skipped because students refused or for other reasons, this statistic accounts for the elementary school, middle school and high school. Alone, other high schools in New Jersey had opt out rates as high as sixty-nine percent (Nj.com). More than 285,000 students in New Jersey decided to opt out of the 2016 test.
Backlash from parents start at the idea of being tested on computers, and the lower rate of success. Parents explain their children do not need to be put through rigorous hours of testing without purpose. Other parents feel standardized testing is essential for future assessments and acquires as great and affordable practice. Will you decide to take the PARCC this year?

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PARCC Testing